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The CTA Morgan Green/Pink Line station will open this month. Photo by Seth Anderson. 

I’ve stopped updating the Grid Network page; no new posts since mid-April appear there. I coded the function myself and it was using too many server resources to operate, slowing down the website. The Network was build on top of our Links page, so that lives on.

Here are some of the new links we’ve added:

  • Transport Nexus. A focus on transportation policy as it relates to land use. Very wonky and written by a transit agency employee.
  • Let the Midway Bloom. The author writes about transportation in the Hyde Park area, and promotes small streets as a way to revitalize neighborhoods. He also advocates for dense housing in the Midway.
  • Chicago Streetcar Renaissance. Streetcars can be used as an economic development tool. Chicago was once riddled with tram lines.
  • TRANSPORT/LAND. A Portland, Oregon-based blog about using cargo bikes for disaster relief, coffee delivery, and carrying grandkids on trikes.

What other links should we add?

Visit our different social media outlets, which offer additional ways to find new websites, photos, and videos

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  • James Harris

    I really love this blog. Thanks for posting these links!

    • http://www.stevevance.net/ Steven Vance

      You’re welcome. Are there any blogs that you read you think we should link to?

  • http://transportnexus.com/ Ryan Richter

    Hey Steven, thanks for the shout out on your site. In my corner of the planning world, you can do no wrong in linking to Pedestrian Observations (http://
    http://pedestrianobservations.wordpress.com/) , another wonky transit blog that is one of the best out there.

    • http://www.stevevance.net/ Steven Vance

      Ah, yes, I read Alon’s blog. I should add Systemic Failure, too (written by someone who calls themselves the Drunk Engineer). Very funny and succinct commentary.

      • http://transportnexus.com/ Ryan Richter

        Another good one. Also, Cap’n Transit. Cap’n Transit and Pedestrian Observations largely cover transit and land use issues from a New York perspective, but they write about many things that pertain to us in Chicago.